This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

ANTIQUE RESTORATION NYC

By | December 10th, 2010|Antique Restoration NYC, Entry, Mirrors, Silver leaf gilding|

 antique mirror restoration nyc

This is a very large antique mirror (6′ wide x 10′ tall) we recently restored for a studio loft space in midtown.  It was a tricky project in terms of moving the mirror and ensuring that restoration remained intact.  It’s recommended if you have furniture this large and expensive to hire a professional crater and mover to take care of it.

ERA Interiors offers outstanding customer satisfaction and is dedicated to every single detail involved with antique restoration.  Our antique restoration services include reconditioning finishes, gilding and frame repair, faux finishes, furniture repair, french polishing, fabricating parts, chair caning, inlay and carving.

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Antiques and Art Show

By | September 10th, 2010|FINISH|

Antiques & art new york city

http://www.avenueshows.com/index.php

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Verifying authenticity of Antique Furniture (Part III)

By | July 29th, 2010|Antique Restoration NYC, Appraisals, Bathroom, Bedroom, Federal, French Hand Polish, Living Space, SEATING, Stools|

Regency StoolIn part I and part II of steps to identify if the furniture you are looking at is truly an antique we outline some basic visual cues that can help you in determining the age. It’s essential to find out as much history as you can about the piece of furniture especially who the manufacturer was and the date of its construction. A reputable dealer should be able to provide these free of charge. If it’s origin seems to be a “mystery” and you are not yet ready to pay for an appraisal take a digital photo and head to the library. Many of the top manufacturers kept detailed product information in antique catalogs and if you can find out the date and model you might be able to compare it with similar pieces for sale on the web.
Here are another three ways you may be able to verify authenticity:
1) If there are inlaid designs on the wood the shapes tend to be less exact and often there are gaps in the wood (machine made inlay often has very smooth edges which fit together perfectly and no gaps in the wood)
2) If the chair has armrests or feet check to see if there is natural looking wear. Often repeated hand or arm touching of the armrests will leave an irregular looking wear to the stain. Examine these closely as it’s possible to mimick this wear with a machine
3) Check the feet and see how their worn, often an old piece will have dents and the wood will be severely receded in the foot area. If the feet seem to be in tip top shape that’s a very telling sign that it’s a reproduction or was restored in a way which may reduce it’s value.

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Verifying Authenticity of Antiques (Part II)

By | July 23rd, 2010|Antique Restoration NYC, Consoles Tables, Entry, Living Space, SERVICES, Side tables, Tables|

The age of antiques is a big factor in determining the value of a piece of furniture, some dealers consider pieces older than 60 years antiques while others consider 100 or more years old to be. Furniture was not made by machine until the early 1860s, so a key factor in addition to determining the age is whether or not the piece of furniture was made by a machine. Here are five more ways to distinguish whether or not the furniture you are considering is an antique:
1) What kind of wood was used and were multiple types of wood used, if the bottoms of the drawers are a different type of wood it’s probably an antique
2) For Marble pieces check the back edge to see whether or not it’s jagged, if it’s smooth it’s probably not an antique because the instruments used for smoothing marble are more recent.
3) Check for signs of aging on the edges of the arms and bottom of the feet, it’s difficult to reproduce natural looking wear and aging.
4) If the piece is upholstered with hay or horsehair, it’s probably an antique
5)Other signs of age include cracking, warping and fading, ragged edges (old fashioned handsaw)

If the item is an antique reproduction by a master craftsman it may still be very valuable but some high end dealer may not value it as highly. Some collectors prefer specific styles and eras, or have a preference for a certain maker of the furniture. Either way if it as an authentic antique it’s value is usually based on what condition the item is in, how rare it is and if the history associated with it.

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Verifying Authenticity of Antiques (Part I)

By | July 22nd, 2010|Antique Restoration NYC, Armchairs, Chairs, SEATING, SERVICES|

There are many stores in New York City, on 1st dibs and around the world selling antiques. Often, upon closer inspection, many of these expensive and sought after items are not antiques at all. We’ve come across a number of instances where clients brought us an antique and they want an additional piece created. And were disappointed to find out that the credenza they paid $55,000 for was actually created in the 40s and there are plenty of other versions of it out there. The historical and unique component associated with antiques are what give them value. Five basic ways you can check to see whether or not they are in fact antiques are:
1) Thickness of veneer (if it’s very thin veneer chances are it’s not an antique)
2) The color of the glue (if it’s black it’s probably an antique)
3) The shape of the nailheads (if they are square it’s an antique)
4) The type of joints (Dovetail joints were used for high quality antiques)
5) Check the saw marks on the underside (circular saw built marks after 1850, straight saw marks before 1850)

If you are unsure and really love the piece of furniture it is completely worth hiring a professional antique appraiser to take a look at it. A good appraiser will run you between $200-$400 which is a drop in the bucket for a piece of furniture costing $100k.

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